Monday, April 22, 2013

Ritorno alla Terra

Questo mi fa piangere per quanto e forte il Sig. Petrini, il poeta del movimento Slow Food




'It is not a Utopian world I am talking about, it is human nature to overcome these types of challenges but let me tell you now, the biggest challenge humanity faces today is how to return to the land'

Slow Money in the Rockies

Got Slow Money?

Friday, April 19, 2013

La Dolce Vita


Cafe Invites Diners On Culinary Tour Of Italy

By Dianne Copelon, Sentinel Correspondent
DAYTONA BEACH — In Italy, food is as popular as art and the opera. And there's plenty of it.
The country boasts a cuisine that pleases even those who have never crossed the Atlantic to dine in a candlelit arbor of an old Tuscan villa, or to try the house specialty at a standup pizzeria in Naples, or to join a family party at a fluorescent-bright trattoria in Rome.
People love Italy's pasta, pizza and pastries.
''We have 20 different regions in Italy and more than that many different types of cuisines,'' said Sylvana Hoitt, co-owner of La Dolce Vita Bakery and Cafe on North Beach Street. ''Sometimes breads and pastries vary from city to town within the same region.''
Hoitt and her brother, Raymond Hoitt, opened their tiny shop last year as a bakery and sold five types of Italian bread as well as a variety of pastries and cakes. Earlier this month they expanded the front of the store into a cafe and added Italian-style sandwiches, salads and frittatas (Italian omelets that look like French quiches) to the menu.
''We want to share our rich Italian specialties with our customers, many of whom have never heard of them,'' she said.
Hoitt, who was born in Florence, a city in central Italy synonymous with art, fashion and Chianti wine, brings several Florentine baking traditions into her shop.
Cookie trays filled with cantuccini, almond cookies of Prato, empty quickly when coffee drinkers stop by for a cup of espresso or cappuccino.
''These hard cookies are a specialty of Prato, a city near Florence famous for its textiles and its cookies,'' Hoitt explained. ''Many Italians call them simply biscotti (biscuits) and like to dunk them in a glass of sweet amber wine called Vin Santo before nibbling them. But they're great dipped in coffee, too.
''Amaretti (almond paste cookies) are good with espresso and cappuccino, too.''
Hoitt fills her cake trays with other Italian delights that offer a miniature sweet tooth tour of her homeland: Cassata and cannoli from Sicily, torta della nonna (custard pie) from Tuscany, crostata di mandorle (almond tart) from Abruzzo, crostata di ricotta (Roman cheesecake) from Latium and traditional rum cakes popular throughout the country.
''Most people have tried cannoli, those crunchy pastry shells filled with a mixture of creamy ricotta, nuts and fruits. They're so popular in the south of Italy that it's impossible to have any celebration without them.''
''But few have enjoyed cassata, another Sicilian specialty, that is a simple cake decorated to taste,'' Hoitt said.
Desserts usually mean the end of a meal for Americans. Italians, on the other hand, don't wait that long to enjoy their pastries and cakes. They eat them for midmorning or midafternoon treats or to honor guests at times when a regular meal may not be wanted or possible.
''Desserts can signify good times and festivities, special days or rewards for deeds well done,'' Hoitt said. ''They're also good for banishing the blues.''
Hoitt admonishes people who pass up dessert and move straight to coffee.
''That's probably because they've indulged in one too many treats that are overly sweet, heavy and fussy. Italian sweets are none of those,'' she said.
La Dolce Cafe keeps an Italian flavor on its salad menu with antipasto plates and pasta salads. Sandwiches tour Italy from the Alps in the north to Rome, which is considered the beginning of the southern regions of the land.
''We make our own breads for these sandwiches, including the multigrain German-style bread from the north; a hard-crust Romano bread that comes not from Rome, but from the central part of the country near Bologna, and focaccia, a tasty flat herb bread popular in Tuscany.''
Hoitt has named her sandwiches after the towns and regions that inspired them: Tuscan, Alpine, Florentine and Roma. There's also the Americano and the Vegetarian.
The cafe and bakery are open from 10 a.m.to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday.  Hoitt hopes to expand the cafe hours into the evening and add music.
La Dolce Vita Bakery and Cafe is at 116 N. Beach St., Daytona Beach.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Fragile

video

Is global warming real? Do you see the connection? - Nele Azevedo's poignant and eye opening installations in Chile, Berlin, Florence -

Underneath that, I feel doubly affected by the melting ice people, just because they seem like real beings, moving, melting, vulnerable, fragile - reminds me of dying creatures, like the gigantic, elegant elephants falling to their knees when shot by poachers, and how quickly really, our realities can fall apart and end.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

My Super Hero

Today we celebrate the Birthday of The Beautiful One.


My mom, my heroine.
Independent of the fact that I love her because she is my mom. She also showed me that kindness and courage are always the lead, in the face of adversity and also during times of abundance and grace, when there is a tendency to isolate and become insular, rather than share our gifts. 


With her innate sense of style, that comes from deep inside her and is unerring she modeled elegance and creativity every single day.  I still take notes !


For me, she is the blueprint for a certain kind of woman, a real woman, one of the world but who is grounded with her family, loyal to her friends, generous to her community


Elegance in character, you see it in her eyes


Happy Birthday adorata you are an amazing woman.


Thank you for being who you are. 

Saturday, April 13, 2013

Lounge

The Stranglers - Golden Brown. Love the look. Love the sound.


(found via Shoval Zohar on FB)

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Magi

From Sharon Jeffries


ACE OF SPADESTHE MAGI
The Ace of Spades is the card of the magician, and with this influence comes a tremendous power to manifest in the physical plane. The higher side of this card bears great spiritual wisdom, and having this birthday can create an internal tug of war between the desire for wisdom and the drive to succeed in worldly ways. The secret lies in finding a balance which embraces both, and in doing so you tap the unlimited possibilities that exist in every area of your life. Your nature is ambitious, forward moving and focused. You are very giving and loving, and at times very selfish; as an ace it's your nature to be so. Learning to listen with total presence is of utmost importance for your truest success. You have incredible intelligence and can accomplish anything you set out to do gaining great reward and recognition, and you very well could have many careers in this one lifetime. You long for a perfect love more than anything else, and have a tendency toward high ideals when it comes to relationship; take care that this does not lead to disappointment. You are here to learn and embody the higher ideals of love, and that which you dream does come to you in time. Give of yourself in whatever ways you can, for it is through giving that you find your greatest happiness.